How To Tie Two Fishing Lines Together

Most anglers know how to tie two fishing lines together, but do they know the strongest possible knot? I learned this knot from Bruce, a South African guide living in the Seychelles, a few years ago and I have used it ever since for joining nylon (as in shock leader) to braided line.

When I asked Bruce what was wrong with a simple ‘double grinner’ he said he would show me. We joined a length of braid to monofilament at each end, my D.G at one end and Bruce’s at the other, then pulled to destruction. Guess what? My knot broke every time! They say you learn something every day…

There is only one problem: for best results this knot requires two people to be involved. If you are alone it can be done, but it needs two ‘anchoring points’ for the braid to keep it held tight. It is not, in fact, too difficult to tie, but I fear it is somewhat more difficult to describe! Anyway, here goes…

In the pics the heavy green cord represents the monofil and the orange the braid.

Figure 1 - Strongest Fishing Knot

Fig 1 (above)

With the braid pulled tight (by your accomplice or between two anchor points) wrap the braid around it once to the right.

Figure 2 - Strongest Fishing Knot

Fig 2

Once you’ve wrapped the mono around the braid once to the right, bring it over and wrap it once to the left, forming a figure of eight. Pull if fairly tight, then take it back to the right and wrap it once more. Pulling the mono fairly tight between each turn, repeat this figure of eight ten times, then release the end of the braid from its anchor point, ready for the next step.

Figure 3 - Strongest Fishing Knot

Fig 3

With the braid end released, take the braid and make a half hitch around the monofil AND the braided line. Then make a second half hitch around the SAME section mono and braid, but make your half hitch in the opposite direction to the first. Then do a second in the original direction followed by a second in the opposite, and so on. Repeat these half hitches eight times (four in each direction).

Figure 4 - Strongest Fishing Knot

Fig 4

Once you’ve made eight half-hitches, leave out the monofil and continue the same alternating hitch on the braid only, as shown above.

Figure 5 - Strongest Fishing Knot

Fig 5

Repeat these hitches around the braided line only, turning it another four times in each direction. You can see above that you now have a knot extending up the braided line only (it looks a bit of a mess at this stage, don’t worry!).

Figure 6 - Strongest Fishing Knot

Fig 6

After completing these eight alternate half-hitches around the braided line (four left and four right), pull it tight and trim the ends of both lines to a length of 1/8th of an inch.

Figure 7 - Strongest Fishing Knot

Fig 7

Burn the ends carefully with a lighter until they are fairly flush with the knot, and pull tight!

In the pics it looks rather clumsy, but in reality it is as neat as you like, and flies up the rod rings like silk. Perhaps more importantly, it retains full line strength and will never let you down – give it a try – you will be impressed!